Digital Studies Group

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Announcing the Digital Humanities Initiative Fall Schedule!

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  • #15479
    Amanda Licastro
    Participant

    Fall 2012 CUNY Digital Studies/Digital Humanities Seminar Schedule
    http://cunydhi.commons.gc.cuny.edu/2012/09/24/fall-2012-cuny-digital-studiesdigital-humanities-seminar-schedule/

    We are delighted to announce our schedule for Fall 2012, sponsored by the Center for the Humanities at the CUNY Graduate Center.

    All events are free and open to the public, and take place at the CUNY Graduate Center.

    Thursday October 4: Seminar Meeting & Provost’s Digital Innovation Grant Awardees

    Time & Place: 6:30pm-8:30pm, Room TBA

    Join us as we welcome current and new members of the Seminar to an open meeting where we will discuss plans for the upcoming year and winners of the Provost’s Digital Innovation Grants will present their project work to date. This newly-launched award supports innovative digital projects designed, created, programmed, or administered by doctoral and master’s students at the CUNY Graduate Center.

    Wednesday October 24: “Modeling the Past: New Projects of The Virtual World Heritage Laboratory”
    Co-Sponsored by the M.A. Program in Liberal Studies

    Bernard Frischer (University of Virginia)

    Time & Place: 6:30pm-8:30pm, Room C201/202

    Bernard Frischer, Director of the Virtual World Heritage Laboratory, University of Virginia, will discuss the team’s work modeling Hadrian’s Villa, a World Heritage Site. The imperial villa is being recreated in 3D by the VWHL and used as a test-bed for experiments in Roman cultural geography. The model includes terrain, gardens, water features, sculpture, buildings, furnishings, and avatars representing members of the imperial court. The IDIA Lab at Ball State University, a partner in the project, has taken the 3D model and ported it to the game engine Unity3D, so that it is possible to explore the reconstructed villa interactively over the Internet. This talk will present the project, its history, goals, current state, and future prospects.

    Monday November 26: “Digital Publishing Today”

    Ashley Dawson (CUNY), Matthew K. Gold (CUNY), Michael Mandiberg (CUNY), Tavia Nyong’o (NYU)

    Time & Place: 6:30pm-8:30pm, The Skylight Room (9100)

    What are the radical possibilities of open access publishing? This panel will bring together a number of scholars who have published online to consider how university presses are either facilitating or impeding efforts by academics to explore new forms of cultural production and media activism unleashed by movements such as Occupy Wall Street. Join us to explore these questions and to develop new strategies and models for contemporary academic publication.

    Wednesday November 28: “The Commons and Digital Humanities in Museums”
    Co-Sponsored by the Ph.D. Program in Art History and CUNY Graduate Center Digital Initiatives

    Christina DePaolo (Balboa Park Online Collaborative), Michael Edson (Smithsonian), William Noel (University of Pennsylvania), Neal Stimler (Metropolitan Museum of Art)

    Time & Place: 6:30pm-8:30pm, The Skylight Room (9100)

    Inspired by the work of Lawrence Lessig, Lewis Hyde and Bill Ivey among others, museum technologists have been striving to provide greater access to cultural heritage collections in the form of a commons. The currents of DIY, digital humanities, free and remix culture have challenged museums to transform their relationships with scholars and the public toward openness and democratic participation. The GLAM-WIKI movement and Creative Commons licenses have also significantly reshaped museum practices. How can museums build vanguard collaborations and collective resources not only to aid constituents as they use institutional content but to create anew in a digital culture? This panel will explore the diverse implications of the formation of commons by museums.

    #26053
    Amanda Licastro
    Participant

    REMINDER -October 4: Seminar Meeting & Provost’s Digital Innovation Grant Showcase

    http://cunydhi.commons.gc.cuny.edu/2012/10/01/october-4-seminar-and-innovation-grant-showcase/

    Please join the CUNY Digital Studies/Digital Humanities Seminar this Thursday October 4, 2012 for our first meeting of the Fall 2012 semester. We will discuss plans for the upcoming year and winners of the Provost’s Digital Innovation Grants will present their project work to date. This newly-launched award supports innovative digital projects designed, created, programmed, or administered by doctoral and master’s students at the CUNY Graduate Center.

    The event is free and open to the public. We look forward to seeing you there!

    Thursday, October 4, 2102, 6:30pm-8:30pm

    Room C205, CUNY Graduate Center

    Seminar Meeting & Provost’s Digital Innovation Grant Showcase

    Sharing their work will be:

    Naomi Barrettara (Musicology): The Open Music History Project

    The Open Music History Project will be an open music history “textbook,” designed to ultimately be an interactive, flexible, adaptable, affordable, and freely available online resource for teachers and students of western music history.

    Amanda Licastro (English): The Writing Studies Tree

    The Writing Studies Tree is an online, open-access, crowd-sourced database of scholarly relationships within writing studies, composition/rhetoric and related academic fields. The other members of the team are Ben Miller (English) and Jill Belli (Assistant Professor, English, City Tech).

    Micki Kaufman (U.S. History): “Data Mining Diplomacy”: A Computational Analysis of the State Department’s Foreign Policy Files

    This research project is an application of big data computational techniques like those employed by Michel et al. (“Culturomics: Quantitative Analysis of Culture Using Millions of Digitized Books”) and Nelson (“Mining the Dispatch”) to the study of diplomatic history.

    Jacob Lederman (Sociology): Urban Sociology Digital Mapping and Presentation Tool

    This project proposes creating a collaborative, customized Google mapping tool to be housed on an urban sociology class portal where students can upload data, photos, and systematic observations to generate a living, interactive “quilt” or patchwork of social scientific knowledge on various neighborhoods of the city.

    Antonia Santangelo (Anthropology): The Black Sea Fish and Mollusca Project

    The Black Sea Fish and Mollusca Project employs Omeka, an open source web-publishing platform for the display of library, museum, archives, and scholarly collections and exhibitions, to showcase a physical comparative collection of fish skeletons and mollusc shells from the Black Sea coastal regions of Bulgaria, Turkey, Romania, Ukraine, Russia and Georgia.

    Rondi Silva (Urban Education): Debunking the “Dropout” Stereotype

    This multi-modal study aims to challenge conventional views of “dropping out” and “dropouts” using video modules co-created and curated by its youth participants.

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