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Computing Integrated Teacher Education (CITE) @ CUNY

Computing Integrated Teacher Education is a four-year initiative to support CUNY faculty at all ranks to integrate state standards aligned computing content and pedagogy into required education courses, field work and student teaching. Supported by public funding from the New York City Department of Education (NYC DOE) Computer Science for All (CS4All) program and private funding from the Robin Hood Learning + Technology Fund, the initiative will focus on building on and complementing the success of NYCDOE CS4All and pilots to integrate computational thinking at Queens College, Hunter College and Hostos Community College.

The initiative focuses on:
– Supporting institutional change in teacher education programs
– Building faculty computing pedagogical content knowledge through the lens of culturally response-sustaining education
– Supporting faculty research in equitable computing education, inclusive STEM pedagogies, and effects on their students’ instructional practices

Module 3 — Lehman College

  • Background

    • The design process is at the center of our work together this summer.

    Task

    • We invite you to visually represent or model your own design process using some digital tool.
    • You can capture how you design or make anything — whether it’s related to your work as a teacher educator or not.
    • You can share your typical design process, or create a vision for a more idealized or aspirational design process.
    • We think doing this will help you learn a new digital tool, and to help you think intentionally about your design process in advance of our work together this summer.

    To complete this task:

    To visualize your design process, select and use a digital tool  – preferably one that’s new to you or that you want more practice with. You can use one of the ones we recommend below, or locate your own.

    NOTE: Some of these require you to create accounts. If you’d like, take a look at the privacy policies of these tools to see if the benefits of signing up would outweigh the risks for you.

    Stuck?

    • Consult any online tutorials the tool may have on their site
    • Try sketching something on paper first, or do some free-writing to generate ideas about how you generally go about design!
    • Make multiple “rapid prototype” iterations until something feels right.
    • If you’re stuck on something, we encourage you to troubleshoot. Google around, use your colleagues as resources, or go to our help sessions on Mondays!

    To Share:

    • Reply to this thread.
    • Add a brief reflection:
      • Share something new you learned about the tool you used.
      • Did you look at the privacy policy? Did anything stand out there?
      • Share any limitations of the tool that you used that you discovered.
    • You can share your work as a link, or an attachment to this discussion thread
    • If you’d like to embed an image in your post, you’ll have to upload it somewhere first (for example at imgur). Then use the image icon in the discussion forum to link to it.
Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)
  • For the design process, I played with Loopy. I had never used this tool before so I waned to try it out and I was excited that it was an open source tool. I read the FAQ and saw that the tool and the visualizations are in the public domain. This is great for me to know about for helping faculty in creating OER. It took me a few minutes to figure out how to make the circles to add nodes, but that’s on me since I just needed to look at the how to button.

    On the Excel sheet of artifacts, I did wish there was a column on the Copyright or Creative Commons license assigned to the artifact and where the artifact can be found (like in CUNY Academic Works or on the Academic Commons or OER Commons). I would love to see more copyright education in Teacher Ed and it seems really relevant to teachers to know if and how they can revise and remix an artifact created through the CITE grant.

    I tried to use the embed code, but it looks like that’s not possible in the comments on the Commons. I saved my Loopy as a link instead.

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by Stacy Katz.
    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by Stacy Katz.
    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by Stacy Katz.
    Anonymous

    I also explored Loopy as it’s a new tool to me. It uses only lines and circles, which is simple and straightforward. It took me a few minutes to figure out how to add lines and also amount of color to fill the circle node. I briefly read the privacy policy and was surprised that they collect so many different kinds of information. I never read privacy policy before. I think it might be a good idea to have teacher candidates and students to read and analyze different privacy policies to better understand being safe on internet.

    In terns of limitation, Loopy cannot be use to show more complex design processes, the size of circle cannot be changed and lines cannot overlap. Here is the link to the Loopy I made.

     

    I explored Miro, Canva and Loopy. I had not used any of these tools before. I’m leaning towards canva and miro because I’m able to go back and retrieve my work, whereas with Loopy once I closed out the window I could not get the link to my work and lost it all.

    Canva

    Miro

    I wanted to try something new so I tried Loopy . I had read IDEO’s Design Thinking for Educators and was interested in the seven rules of brainstorming. There were lots of ideas in the Design Thinking for Educators that I’d like to apply in addition to the five stage process, such as keeping visual reminders of the work, providing alone time as well as group time, and the elements for building prototypes: diagram, storyboard, ad, mock-up, model, role play.

    A limitation was that I couldn’t figure out how to add extra nodes–so I used the text tool to add the ideas that I wanted to include.

    I enjoyed working with the Excel tool and will try a Pivot table with some data that I have. It seems like a really helpful way to understand a lot of data.

    I was intrigued by Miro and I decided to use one of its templates to play with an idea for using AI with classroom observation notes. I am very much not there yet! My experiment is twofold: (1) to create a Miro-based organizer for taking notes in the classroom, and (2) using keywords from the notes to generate a informational paragraph about the observation. What I’ve linked here is very much my process in process. What I’ve created is not useful, and I need to rethink what it is that I want to do with Miro and AI or with one without the other. Regardless, what I would like to create is a way to indirectly code observation notes so that I can see patterns and trends in them that I might otherwise miss. Again, what I’m sharing here does not do this!

    Hola, I decided to go with “Loopy” because I couldn’t resist exploring a site with such a whimsical name! I’m glad I did. While I created the most simple graphic, I wanted to learn how to do more. I look forward to exploring this resource in more depth. I believe that right now, I am my own limitation; delving into digital literacy (beyond the “basics”) is something very new to me. I tend to be a “tinkerer”, so I will continue to tinker and see what feels right to me.

    https://ncase.me/loopy/v1.1/?data=%5B%5B%5B1,424,207,1,%22Your%2520Cultural%2520Assets%2520%2526%2520Teaching%2520Practices%22,4%5D,%5B2,426,366,1,%22Student’s%2520Cultural%2520Assets%2520%2526%2520Learning%22,5%5D%5D,%5B%5B2,1,94,1,0%5D,%5B1,2,89,1,0%5D%5D,%5B%5D,2%5D

     

    When I read the word, “Loopy,” I envisioned spiral loops in my head so I had to go with that one. I liked moving back and forth so easily between word and image, and tried, but didn’t quite succeed in creating a spiral image. As a way to ‘embrace complexity’ (my module 2 topic), I would have liked to make it less linear. However, I did capture my artistic process… somewhat! Plus it’s fun! I found it hard to move the circles once created and would have appreciated the ability to change the text font. I did review the copyright license, and particularly enjoyed the following words, “waives, abandons, and surrenders…” and “revocation, rescission, cancellation, termination:” it was better than a Thesaurus!

     

    Attachments:
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    Well,  I played around with Padlet as I was thinking about my design image, but got frustrated with locating the features I needed and lost interest,  and so went back to PowerPoint and used SmartArt. I knew my design would have to contain something cyclical given my process and some important elements front and center serving as the core (who is my audience, why am I doing this/what purposes will it serve, what mindsets/design principles should I be considering?). So, I came up with an image that I took a photo of and uploaded into Imgur (my trying out a new platform) and then created a live link here in this Commons post.

    https://imgur.com/CiyeU1T

    My guess is that this process will change as I get further into the work.

    I decided to use Miro since I have not used it before. Miro offered several easy to use templates. I used the flowchart template to outline my design process. Also, it was easy to share my work. I did look at the privacy policy. Nothing stood out to me. Most of it was very standard. So far I have not discovered any limitations for Miro.

    Naliza’s Design Flowchart

    This was very fun and also very stressful. I chose loopy because I had never used it before but it also seemed straightforward. It was, however it was also challenging. I wasn’t able to use an “undo” option nor was I able to create my own circles?!

    I did create a loopy which I used to think about how creating a podcast might be useful to me as an individual and also to my department. See it linked here

    The privacy policy was pretty jarring however since none of the contents of my loopy were proprietary or directly linked to me as individual I decided it could still be a useful tool in some circumstances.

    This was very fun and also very stressful. I chose loopy because I had never used it before but it also seemed straightforward. It was, however it was also challenging. I wasn’t able to use an “undo” option nor was I able to create my own circles?!

    I did create a loopy which I used to think about how creating a podcast might be useful to me as an individual and also to my department. See it linked here

    The privacy policy was pretty jarring however since none of the contents of my loopy were proprietary or directly linked to me as individual I decided it could still be a useful tool in some circumstances. Conversely, it’s use in the public domain could be a benefit, no licensing, etc.

    Lingyu! I want you to make me some dumplings!!!

    I am so sad! I just wrote a whole reflection and then clicked on my link to make sure it worked and deleted everything!!

    Hi Everyone! I looked through a few of your responses first, specifically those of you who did a Loopy. A few of you were not that enthused with it, so I just decided to look at Miro. I read that Miro works well with google (and I love google everything), so I went for it! I was pleasantly surprised. Miro has a few different layouts that you could try, mostly for brainstorming and organization. But I chose to try a mindmap. I used it to plan out my artifact design a little bit more, and I am feeling super excited to try using another mind map for my dissertation writing.

    Here is what I came up with for the artifact design process: https://miro.com/app/board/uXjVM2lsAbk=/?share_link_id=356186266404 (hopefully it works because I am not trying it again!)

    Also I read through the privacy policy, and I am so annoyed that there are so many words, and it is talking in circles, why can’t it explicitly tell me what parts of my information it is using in clear language. I just got so frustrated that I gave up, twice. At this point I don’t even care if they use my information, because what part of my information is so special and secretive!?? Just use it! -__-

Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)

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