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Computing Integrated Teacher Education (CITE) @ CUNY

Computing Integrated Teacher Education is a four-year initiative to support CUNY faculty at all ranks to integrate state standards aligned computing content and pedagogy into required education courses, field work and student teaching. Supported by public funding from the New York City Department of Education (NYC DOE) Computer Science for All (CS4All) program and private funding from the Robin Hood Learning + Technology Fund, the initiative will focus on building on and complementing the success of NYCDOE CS4All and pilots to integrate computational thinking at Queens College, Hunter College and Hostos Community College.

The initiative focuses on:
– Supporting institutional change in teacher education programs
– Building faculty computing pedagogical content knowledge through the lens of culturally response-sustaining education
– Supporting faculty research in equitable computing education, inclusive STEM pedagogies, and effects on their students’ instructional practices

Module 1 – Lehman

  • Reply to this post with a response to the prompts below by the module due date.

    • Introduce yourself with your name, college, role(s)
    • Share the rationale cards you kept in your hand all the way to the end of the game. Why did you keep these to the end? Why did you discard particular cards?
    • What connections can you make between the values you reviewed and the examples from people’s digital lives?
    • How did you interact with the game? What worked / didn’t work about our game prototype? Did you follow the rules as written? Did you “tinker” with the algorithm (rules) of the game? If so, how?
Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
  • Hi, I’m Alison Lehner-Quam, education librarian at Lehman College. I selected 19 (“engage in design thinking and user-centered design”), 26 (“media literacy”), 30 (“students need to be literate in new ways–communicate in many different expressive forms”), 35 (“sustain the cultural, linguistic, and other practices of students and their communities”), and 43 (“inquiry-based learning approaches”).

    A number of the projects that I viewed on the Padlet site involved work relevant to the community in from which it developed, inquiry, design thinking, and student expression. These aspects connect to the values that I selected.

    If I could add one more, it would be 16 (“tinkering and making–leading to wonder, discovery…”).

    I actually used 3 piles when I played the game: a discard pile, a pile that resonated with me, and a pile that I thought I might end up with. This way, those that I started with in my hand, which were random, could eventually find their way into one of the piles. I then went to the pile of cards that seemed most relevant to me–and sorted them into the two piles of those 5 most relevant, and those that were my 5 overflow cards. This gave me a chance to revisit those that felt most important–and enabled me to see patterns with the cards when I made my selections (e.g. some started with the same phrases). It would be interesting to revisit this game at the end of the CITE summer session.

    Anonymous

    Hello, I’m Lingyu Li, Assistant Professor of Special Education at Lehman College. I selected the following 5 rationals by looking more at the value of CS education for Equity & Social Justice, and Agency. For example, many projects center on minoritized groups in STEM field (e.g., Girls Who Code, Data for Black Lives) or social justice activism (e.g., Youth-led Social Media Campaign).

    • teachers and students can use new media and computing as a tool for voice, participation, activism and critique related to causes they care about.
    • it can help change the status quo, where our technology is largely designed by economically, racially and socially privileged groups, and their biases and blind spots get embedded in our tech.
    • teachers need to be able to interrogate education technologies for their potentially harmful impacts or assumptions about especially marginalized students and communities.
    • it will help teacher candidates promote systems thinking – the ability to understand the dynamics of and how to intervene in complex systems that are ubiquitous in our world.
    • it is important for teachers to learn to use the tools that will help them effectively meet the needs of students with disabilities (e.g. assistive technologies).

    It’s quite hard for me to pick top 5. I also resonate with many other values such as “it can help teachers learn how to build on students’ tech lives interests, communities, and language practices
    to design and adapt curriculum.” Some values are quite similar to each other, so I kept one.  Actually I did not have the cards at hand while doing the activities, so I created 3 columns: top picks, resonate, good but need further research). I went through all values and put them into different columns). I also think would be interesting to revisit this game at the end and play with real cards.

    Hi all,

    I’m Stacy Katz, Associate Professor and Open Resources Librarian at Lehman College. I looked through the entire deck first. I used the physical cards, but it may have been easier for me to look at them online. My 7 year old was sitting with me so she read some of the cards out loud to me also.

    I chose:

    • 42 – teachers can learn to find, use and create open educational resources that will be more accessible to them and their students
    • 11 – youth shouldn’t just be consumers but also producers of technology
    • 33 – data practices like collection, analysis, and visualization can help teachers and students understand phenomena, conduct inquiries, share findings
    • 9 – it can help change the status quo, where our technology is largely designed by economically, racially and socially privileged groups, and their biases and blind spots get embedded in our tech
    • 16 – because the process of tinkering and making can lead to wonder, discovery and enjoyment for students and teachers

    While I was pleased to see OER listed in a card, I feel like the phrasing wouldn’t be understandable to most teacher educators about what OER really is. It’s not just about making accessible resources (and accessible from a not paywalled situation, not necessarily accessible in a universal design sense, though ideally it is). It’s about teachers creating resources that can be retained, revised, reused, remixed, and redistributed. It’s about teachers understanding copyright and permissions and seeing themselves as experts. In my work on OER with teacher educators with Jennifer Van Allen, teachers often rely on teachers pay teachers and use these generic lesson plans that they pay for and still don’t meet their students’ needs. When we taught students about OER, they asked why they didn’t learn about this sooner and they understood how it builds an educational culture of sharing (and also some vulnerability for them to share their own work openly).

    For youth being producers instead of consumers, I also see that as a function of open pedagogy. I think there’s a lot of power in students learning how they can share their work publicly and moving to assignments where they create something from their passions.

    Also, I chose that last one about enjoyment and wonder because there is an element of fun that should be emphasized in education. There’s so much ability for tinkering to lead to self-directed learning and continued lifelong learning.

    In terms of the game, I felt frustrated by some of the phrasing on the cards. Some of them seemed to make declarative statements about what computing and digital literacy education can do and felt like they needed qualifiers or more explanation.

     

    Hello, I’m Rabab, Assistant Professor of Mathematics Education at Lehman College. I chose to keep:

    7 – Teachers need to be able to interrogate education technologies for their potentially harmful impacts or assumptions about especially marginalized students and communities.

    26 – It’s important for teachers and students to be able to be media literate, differentiate between accurate and inaccurate information and conduct effective online research.

    29 – teachers should learn to select tools given the content they expect students to learn, and the practices they want to foster (e.g. tools that support algebra learning, exploring science concepts, etc.)

    30 – students will need to be literate in new ways, and be able to communicate in multiple modalities, contexts, and through many different expressive forms.

    43 – it will help teachers usher in more project and inquiry-based learning approaches that can enhance school pedagogy and move away from sage on the stage approaches.

    It was difficult to choose only 5 cards. I originally grouped similar cards together and noticed that there was an overlap in the statements that represented different values. I envisioned Venn diagrams and began looking at their intersection, which made it easier to decide on the ones to keep. The ones I kept addressed some of  the values that I think are important practices for all, teachers, students, citizens. My interpretation of the statements I chose promote critical thinking and literacy.

     

     

    Hello,

    My name is Yaswantie Ameeta Persaud, I work in the School of Education Dean’s Office as the Director of Assessment, Accreditation and Compliance. The cards I felt most connected to are as follows:

    We should integrate computing and digital literacies into teacher education because:

    3-the more people we have that understand computing and digital literacies, the more innovations and new knowledge we can produce as a society
    13-tech is changing the nature of schooling. Teachers need to have knowledge and skills to navigate digital and computational tools and literacies.
    20-it will help teacher candidates promote systems thinking – the ability to understand the dynamics of and how to intervene in complex systems that are ubiquitous in our world.
    33-data practices like collection, analysis, and visualization can help teachers and students understand phenomena, conduct inquiries, share findings.
    41-data practices like collection, analysis, and visualization support teachers with learning about learners and communities, assessment, planning, and reflection.

    Connections to the values I chose and people’s digital lives include, The YAY (Youth Ask Youth) Census where youth participated in designing and implementing a census as well as analyzing the data. The Youth Platform NYC interactive storymap was also interesting as youth could imagine what their city could look like and how it could be improved. Key findings and themes include “safety vs. policing,” “education,” “community cohesion,” and “gentrification.” The goal was to turn the ideas into reality.

    I absolutely “tinkered” with the game. I did start off with 5 cards, however, instead of taking one at a time and replacing the 5 cards in my hand, I laid my 5 initial cards side by side, and while going through the pack, I checked each of the remaining cards to see if there were any I would replace. I replaced as necessary until I had what I perceive to be my top 5 cards. This was a faster process, but it also served as a more visual approach to my learning style. I definitely appreciate that we were allowed to think outside of the box for this activity.

    Hi, My name is Jayra Sanchez, an adjunct professor from Lehman College.

    I really loved this activity. It reminded me of the system used when completing the Passion test by Janet Bray Attwood.

    It was hard to narrow it to 5 cards but the following reflect my true values:

    30- students will need to be literate in new ways, and be able to communicate in multiple modalities, contexts, and through many different expressive forms.

    16- because the process of tinkering and making can lead to wonder, discovery and enjoyment for students and teachers.

    18- teachers and their students should be able to use computing as creative outlet and a tool for digital storytelling, expression, identity development, art.

    14- because integrating computational and design thinking into teacher ed might help teachers develop a curious, debugging mindset that learns from and iterates on failure.

    8- teachers and students can use new media and computing as a tool for voice, participation, activism and critique related to causes they care about.

    For me the tinkering and joy are really important, as well as the outlet for creativity. I am happy to have found my top 5. I think this will narrow my focus when creating my artifact and can keep me honest while designing it and not create something to check off a list but something that reflects my true passion.

     

    I’m Nancy Dubetz from Lehman College and I am a faculty member in Early Childhood and Childhood Education.

    The only card that I started out with through random selection and kept to the end was card 10, “being a good citizen in the 21st century means being a responsible, ethical digital citizen.” The cards that I then added into my first and “overflow” piles seemed to be more specific ways that one might illustrate how one might engage as a responsible, ethical digital citizen, like card 9 (change the status quo), card 13 (tech is changing the nature of schooling), card 24 (supporting students navigating online life), card 15 (getting under the hood to use and adapt to fit needs of learners), card 7 (interrogating the potential harmful impacts. card 6 (helping students see how tech governs their choices), card 14 (using tech as tool for activism and critique), card 4 (preparing tech fluent community members).  All the cards had viable purposes for integrating computing and digital literacies in teacher education, but I found myself leaving out those related to specific practices in special subjects are disciplines just because I thought they could be subsumed under the larger ones I chose.  I’m teaching right now a class of students planning to become teachers and for the first time am finding it really important to embed study of how technology is changing teaching, learning and schooling–I supposed the recent surge of AI has made placed the need for digitally literate teachers front and center for me, particularly as I don’t see much attention to this in the elementary classrooms where I supervised student teachers, despite all the technology that emerged during the pandemic.

    I followed the rules, didn’t tinker much, but as I already shared, I made the card limits work by choosing  from what I saw as larger purposes that could subsume others in the card deck.

    Making my way through the card deck, I was pleasantly surprised to see that each of the statements were relevant and not overly repetitive. Those that were redundant were typically distinct from one another in that one statement might be very general while another might be more specific. As I developed my hand of cards in going through the deck, I noticed that I was veering toward more general statements than specific ones, and, in particular, I was focus on the social aspect of computer science education. My overriding interest is in teacher education became implicit through the game’s process as I chose statements reflecting a broader educational view of students and teachers learning together.

    My final hand was as follows: 18, creative outlet; 35, community practices; 37, communication across activities; 39, experimentating; 43, project-based learning.

    I played the game as the rules were written, but I tinkered at the end. I allowed myself to have 10 cards, per the rules, 5 I wanted to keep and 5 I wanted to have in an overflow pile. However, I ended up with 6 I wanted to keep and 4 in my overflow, so I kept 6!

    37–it can facilitate teachers’ and students’ communication, participation, and reflection in a range of day to day learning activities

    25–it is important for teachers and students to know ho w to build a learning community in digital environments

    34–it will help teachers to meet the needs of all learners, and build on learners’ diverse experiences, resources, abilities

    18–teachers and their students should be able to use computing as a creative outlet and tool for digital storytelling, expression, identity development, art

    30–students will need to be literate in new ways, and be able to communicate in multiple modalities, contexts, and through many different expressive forms

    17–because collaboration on computing/digital literacies projects leads to meaningful relationships both among peers as well as adults

     

    What I noticed was I was mostly drawn to cards that named teachers using the tools themselves so that they could bring the tools into their classrooms so that the kids would have wider options for composing and sharing and processing their thinking. And as I perused the padlet shares, I also gravitated towards digital storytelling shares.

     

    Hi!

    I am, Joi Jones, Student Success Coordinator (Senior CLT)  in the Department of Middle & High School Education (MHSE). I chose my 5 cards based on my roles in the now defunct Fellows edTPA lab, my role as grant administrator of the CITE program at Lehman College and my interest in DEI.

     

    I chose (20) it will help teacher candidates promote systems thinking- the ability to understand the dynamics of and how to intervene in the complex systems that are ubiquitous in our world.

    (1) computational thinking and digital literacies will be the key no matter what teachers’ future students end up in.

    (4) it will help equip local communities to address their own problems through having technologically fluent community members.

    (3) the more people we have that understand computing and digital literacies, the more innovations and new knowledge we can produce as a society.

    and finally (5) we need to level the playing field and help close the “digital divide” for young people who attend lower-resourced schools.

    Bonus, (9) equity and (30) digital literacy/creativity

    Hello. Jose Fabara, Reading Program coordinator and faculty at LaGuardia’s ELA department. I found number 7 to be especially relevant, to bring to the surface in class discussions all the embedded assumptions/prejudices in technology and to interrogate how that affects marginalized communities. One interesting aspect of this that we ourselves may not be very fluent with technology but asking those questions in the classroom can lead to important insights that benefit faculty and students. Number 12 is connected to 7 but in addition to contributing “productively to society as a whole,” we can add more lines of inquiry.

    Hola, I’m Yasmin. Like a deck of Tarot cards, I just randomly chose 5, then an additional one that I discarded because it did not resonate with my values at all (#32).  The value card that aligns most with both my own teaching and “Media Use by Kids Age Zero to Eight” was #35:

    “We should integrate computing and digital literacies into teacher education because…computing and digital tools and literacies can help teachers build on and sustain the cultural, linguistic and other practices of students and their communities.”

     

    Hi,

    My name is Atasi Das. I am an Assistant Professor in the Early Childhood Childhood Education program at Lehman.

    As I was going through the cards, I found myself drawn to holding more than the allotted number of cards. The five that I am choosing to share include

    #7 teachers need to be able to interrogate education technologies for their potentially harmful impacts or assumptions about especially marginalized students and communities

    #16 because the process of tinkering and making can lead to wonder, discovery, and enjoyment for students and teachers

    #18 teachers and their students should be able to use computing as a creative outlet and a tool for digital storytelling, expression, identity development, art.

    #22 teachers can better understand their learners and the contexts for their learning if they understand learners’ digital lives.
    #26 it is important for teachers and students to be able to be media literate, differentiate between accurate and inaccurate information and conduct effective online research.

    I found myself seeking cards that were both about creating with and learning with technology and also understanding the impact of critical histories (connected to multiple -isms) around the development of technologies themselves.

    Hello!

    I am Naliza Sadik, Technology, Teaching and Learning Manager, Lehman

    I decided to keep cards 8, 15, 18, 19 and 43 in my hand at the end of the game. The cards I kept resonated with two of my values when using computing tools/educational technology tools. One is empowerment through the use of technology; helping learners understand that they can use their voices and advocate for change in their communities. The other is enhancing instructional and pedagogical practices through computational tools. We need to shift our practice from teacher-centered to student-centered and technology can serve as a medium for this. But in order to make this shift, teachers need to understand how the tool works. After exploring some of the examples from people’s digital lives, I can see correlation between some of the examples presented and the values I selected. For example, Emoti-Con Youth Digital Media Festival showcases how students are using innovative tools for social change. The game was fun and enlightening. I followed the rules as much as possible. I did have an overflow pile which I then divided into two separate piles. One was for the values that I strongly wanted to include in my final hand because they are ones that are closely related to my work but I stuck to the 5 cards rule and the other were values that are adjacent to the work I do.

    Hola friends! My name is Meagan Serrano, and I am a lecturer in the Special Education department!!!! I think the most important thing to me, was the way the technological movement is engaging with all people in our society, so the cards that I landed up with included, children, teachers, and the community.

    The cards I kept were:

    #4: it will help equip local communities to address their own problems through having technologically fluent community members.

    #11: youth shouldn’t just be consumers but also producers of technology.

    #13: tech is changing the nature of schooling. Teachers need to have knowledge and skills to navigate digital and computational tools and literacies.

    #16: because the process of tinkering and making can lead to wonder, discovery and enjoyment for students and teachers.

    For my fifth card, I cheated, and combined three cards that I thought were similar, but really I just cheated.

    #8,18, & 37: Teachers and students should be able to, and can use new media and computing as a tool for voice, communication, participation, reflection, activism , critique, and as a creative outlet, related to causes they care about, storytelling, expression, identity development, art, and a range of day to day learning activities.

    My rational behind choosing these is that they are all framed in the positive mindset that technology and CSed can really be a positive force and movement that can make the world a better place. Further I believe everything we do in education should be centered around joy, and I think that the cards I chose were centered around joy, love, and bringing our communities up!

    One card that I thought was pretty interesting was #14: because integrating computational and design thinking into teacher ed might help teachers develop a curious, debugging mindset that learns from and iterates on failure. This one was really interesting to me as I consider the way that I teach students with disabilities, and this recent shift to the growth mindset in that making mistakes and failures are just opportunities to find the correct answer, or to try again. Though I have never thought about that in relation to CSed. This card in particular really pushed my thinking.

    I really enjoyed the game, and I would be interested in creating a digital version that all of my students could have access to, as well as a version that K-12 students could have access too. I am a board game lover, and so of course I tinkered with the algorithm! Also, I am a super cheater at games, so idk if what I did counts as tinkering or cheating! Since there were cards where we could write our own, I just combined 3 cards to make my perfect card!

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