• Matthew K. Gold wrote a new blog post What We Did: Feb 24 (Fourth Class; Assessment, Part 2) in the group Group logo of Futures InitiativeFutures Initiative: 1 day, 1 hour ago

    Week 4 — Group 1: Assessment
    Co-authors for this post:
    Janey Flanagan (BMCC) Urban Ed, eLearning
    Maria Greene (BMCC) Urban Ed, Chemistry
    Irene Morrison-Moncure (Hunter) Classics
    In week four, we continued the […]

  • Welcome, Megan!

  • Here’s a link my morning hastac.org blog, in our Futures Initiative group:  “If Academe is Part of the Problem, What’s Our Solution?”  <a title=""If Academe is Part of the Problem, What's Our Solution?"" […]

  • Matthew K. Gold wrote a new post, Literacy: Assessable or Inconclusive?, on the site Futures Initiative 3 days, 16 hours ago

    I just finished teaching a literacy course, called “Intensive Reading.” I think of this class like an intensive yoga workshop that focuses on building our practices slowly but effectively. The students in this […]

  • Matthew K. Gold wrote a new post, Anatomy’s Assessment of Assessment, on the site Futures Initiative 3 days, 23 hours ago

    Last Tuesday’s in-class discussion of assessment strategies really got my juices flowing. How was I going to get my 35 Anatomy students to participate in this first topic of “Mapping The Future…”? How to present […]

  • Shana Kimball started the topic Job Alert: Project Manager with NYPL
    technology in the forum NYCDH Announcements

    “Dear all,

    NYPL Technology has an exciting opportunity for a talented Project Manager
    to guide the development of our core digital collections platforms &
    experimental projects. The full description is below. Please help us spread
    the word!

    Overview:
    The New York Public Library (NYPL) is seeking a talented Project Manager to
    guide the development of its core digital collections platforms and to help
    steward a portfolio of experimental projects in our Flatiron district and
    Stephen A. Schwarzman Building on 42nd Street locations.

    Opportunity:
    At NYPL, we’re building a new kind of library that opens our vast
    collections to the public via responsive applications, linked data and
    APIs, and adventurous user engagement and crowdsourcing initiatives. In
    concert with digital leadership, and with NYPL’s expert community of
    curators, librarians, and data specialists, the Project Manager will help
    advance the development of:

    NYPL’s digital repository: the preservation of significant works of
    human culture ranging from cuneiform tablets to the email correspondence of
    Timothy Leary;

    NYPL Digital Collections website and Archives & Manuscripts portal,
    plus related APIs: public access (by both humans and computers) to our
    digitized assets, finding aids, and metadata;

    our core metadata systems (e.g. ArchivesSpace, The Museum System,
    and a local MODS metadata management system) along with a new generation of
    connectors between them;

    crowdsourcing projects, data mining experiments, and other user
    engagement initiatives.

    The right candidate will have the chance to enable global access to
    mind-blowing material: manuscripts, archives, rare books, maps, A/V,
    photography — you name it, NYPL has collected it and is putting it online.
    The work is both internal and public-facing, involving frequent
    contact/collaboration with experts from museums, publishing, academia, the
    tech industry, the open source community, journalism & media, and the art
    world.

    Responsibilities:
    As Project Manager, you’ll serve as a liaison between the Information
    Technology Group and NYPL digital product teams and other stakeholder
    groups. Your primary responsibilities are to plan, track, communicate and
    help deliver the projects to which you are assigned. You’ll manage projects
    via NYPL-approved project frameworks, including both Agile and traditional
    project management approaches. You’ll also be helping to develop a process
    for transferring successful experiments and incubated products into core
    library platforms. The candidate must be able to identify issues
    proactively, resolve conflicts, escalate if necessary, and work across the
    organization to execute the project.

    Lead cross-functional teams in the development and successful completion of
    small through large-scale initiatives across the entire project lifecycle.
    Take an active leadership role in the project team and create an
    environment that fosters the prescribed project management methods, related
    processes and standards.
    Understand and follow the NYPL project management framework for project
    delivery.
    Ensure that all project team members understand and accept their roles and
    responsibilities.
    Coordinate participation of different tech and stakeholder groups in
    requirements gathering, specifications, design, development and
    implementation of key projects.
    Help estimate project resources and budget as well as manage costs.
    Develop and proactively manage project plans and strategy, scheduling, and
    identification of risks, contingency plans, and the allocation of available
    resources.
    Oversee the deliverables assigned to cross functional teams, vendors and
    business resources.
    Analyze risk and mitigation, including establishing contingency plans and
    initiating corrective action as necessary. Identify, track, and remove
    impediments to project success.
    Facilitating change control.
    Review project requests and participate in the green-light process.
    Keep all stakeholders informed of status and issues. Track and report key
    project metrics.

    Qualifications:
    The position will join the IT PMO group and report to the Director,
    Technology Initiatives. S/he will work closely with the NYPL Repository
    Team, NYPL Labs (http://labs.nypl.org/), and other drivers of NYPL’s future.

    Skills are minimum 5-7 years experience as a PM in a technology services /
    digital media company. PMI best practices knowledge and experience are
    required.
    Solid experience in managing customer facing applications and services
    (technical lead experience not required).
    Project managed medium to large software development or customer-facing
    initiatives.
    Extensive experience with Agile methodology and Scrum.
    Experience managing vendor relationships and projects involving vendor
    selection and implementation.
    Leadership skills and enthusiastic can-do attitude.
    Relationship building and partnership skills.
    Excellent communication, collaboration, and facilitation skills.
    Structured thinking and strong organizational skills.
    Excellent writing and presentation skills.
    Excellent project management and time management skills.
    Self-starter, requiring minimal supervision (but not afraid to call for
    help).
    PMI Certification is highly desirable.
    Bachelor’s Degree

    Bonus points:
    Familiarity with digital library technologies and standards.
    Experience with the Fedora open source repository software.
    Familiarity with library metadata standards (Dublin Core, MODS, MARCXML,
    BIBFRAME, etc.)

  • ThumbnailWeek 3 — Group 1: Assessment
    Co-authors for this post:
    Janey Flanagan (BMCC) Urban Ed, eLearning
    Maria Greene (BMCC) Urban Ed, Chemistry
    Irene Morrison-Moncure (Hunter) Classics
    Week three marked the first […]

  • CBOX offers many options on where to post content—but sometimes having so many possibilities can be overwhelming. With that in mind, I’ve outlined a few places you might want to post, with some details about each. […]

  • Matthew K. Gold wrote a new post, Bowling Alone? Learning Alone? We Can Do Better, on the site Futures Initiative 4 days, 8 hours ago

    ThumbnailIn his classic study Bowling Alone (2000), Robert Putnam argues that we have lost our connection to friends, family, neighbors, and our democratic structures.  He warns that our “social capital” has plummted, […]

  • In last week’s class, we talked about assessment. Formative assessment, summative assessment, and how we use assessment wisely (or not) to activate (or not) student learning, feedback loops, and our own teaching. […]

  • ———- Forwarded message ———-

    The Postcolonial Studies Group (PSG)

    Spring 2015 Colloquium Series presents:

    Rahul K. Gairola

    *Migrations in Absentia: Multinational Digital *

    *Advertising and Manipulation of Partition Trauma*

    Friday, March 20th 2015

    2:30 PM – 4:30 PM, Rm. 5414

    The Graduate Center, CUNY

    Rahul Gairola contributes to existing and new scholarship in Partition and
    affect studies,

    on the one hand, and cultural and digital humanities studies, on the other,
    as the 70th

    anniversary of the geo-political division of South Asia approaches in
    2017. I begin by

    proposing a rationale for two digital advertisements by Google and Coca
    Cola that

    attempt to capitalize on the trauma of Partition by celebrating both
    products as facilitating

    harmony between India and Pakistan. Indeed, these advertisements market
    “happiness”

    as the ultimate horizon of neoliberal experience for the subjects that they
    depict. While I

    do not here want to undermine the nostalgic value or the raw emotions
    behind the

    subjects and sentiments portrayed, I would argue that it is crucial to
    question the ethical

    dilemmas of marketing products that utopically represent the Partition’s
    communal

    bloodshed. In particular, these advertisements promise what I call
    “migrations in

    absentia” – or the promise of movement across borders without moving from
    one’s geo-

    political space. I conclude that despite the hegemonic pull of both ads, a
    number of

    resistant representations counter their influence in the digital public
    sphere.

    Rahul Krishna Gairola teaches in the Department of English at

    Queens and York Colleges, The City University of New York

    (CUNY). He completed a joint Ph.D. in English and Theory &

    Criticism at the University of Washington after holding fellowships

    at Cornell, Cambridge, and Humboldt universities, and the Simpson

    Center for the Humanities. He has globally published and presented

    academic pieces, and taught at a number of colleges and universities

    in the U.S. His first book manuscript is titled Homelandings:

    Diasporic Genealogies of Belonging and Nation, and is currently

    under review at an academic press. He is, with Amritjit Singh and

    Nalini Iyer, also Co-Editor of a collection of essays tentatively

    titled Revisiting Partition. (rgairola@uw.edu)

  • ThumbnailIn the Fall of 2014, as the first research activity of the new Futures Initiative at the Graduate Center, we embarked on a student-led project we are calling the CUNY Map of NYC. This is actually a series of maps […]

  • I have to admit that I was a bit reticent about trying a Think, Pair, Share exercise on a Friday morning Speech Anatomy class, but I think that it turned out to be quite a success. Index cards were handed out to […]

  • Forwarding from NYCDH:

    Francesca Giannetti started the topic Event: Hugoye Symposium on Syriac and
    DH, 3/6 at Rutgers in the forum NYCDH Announcements

    “Hi everyone,

    I’d like to make you aware of an upcoming symposium on Syriac and DH.
    Knowledge of Syriac is not required to follow the presentations.The program
    looks extremely enticing, with researchers coming from near and far. The
    event takes place on March 6, from 10:00 am to 6:30 pm in Alexander Library
    (169 College Avenue, New Brunswick, NJ). The following announcement was
    sent to me by George Kiraz of the Beth Mardutho Research Library.

    With best regards,
    Francesca

    Francesca Giannetti
    Digital Humanities Librarian
    Research and Instructional Services
    Archibald S. Alexander Library
    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
    169 College Avenue
    New Brunswick, NJ 08901-1163

    848-932-6097 | francesca.giannetti@rutgers.edu
    francescagiannetti.com

    The Syriac Institute (Piscataway), Rutgers University, and Syriaca.org
    (Vanderbilt University) are co-hosting a symposium on Syriac and the
    Digital Humanities. Knowledge of Syriac is not necessary to follow the
    talks. The symposium is open to the public, and there is no registration
    fee. There will be live streaming of the event, thanks to the support of
    the Rutgers University library staff. Also, feel free to follow along with
    those of us who will be live tweeting the meeting (you can check in with
    the @bethmardutho account on the day of the conference to get the details).

    The program and other details are available on the following web page:

    http://www.bethmardutho.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=627

    The study of Syriac and other ethnoreligious minority languages and
    literatures from the Middle East has greatly benefited over the last few
    decades from the digital revolution. Syriac studies has one of the oldest
    and longest-lived open access electronic journals (Hugoye, started in 1998,
    currently in volume 18) and Syriac was one of the earliest minority
    languages to be incorporated into Unicode (starting with version 3.0.0 in
    1999). The relative paucity of scholars currently engaged in research on
    Syriac has served as an impetus to adopt digital and particularly open
    access means of scholarly publication.”

  • Posted!

    https://commons.gc.cuny.edu/groups/digital-humanities-initiative/forum/topic/fwd-upcoming-events-on-philology-with-nadia-altschul/

    Best,

    Matt

    On Mon, Feb 16, 2015 at 10:11 AM, Matthew K. Gold <mattgold@gmail.com>
    wrote:

    > Hi All —
    >
    > Please see notice of an upcoming event of interest at Columbia below:
    >
    > ———- Forwarded message ———-
    > From: Grant Wythoff <grant.wythoff@gmail.com>
    >
    >
    > Nadia Altschul
    > On Philology
    >
    > 6:15pm, 18 Feb 2015
    > Heyman Center for the Humanities
    > Second Floor Common Room
    >
    > Philology and the reconstruction of texts has been a main humanistic
    > method since the purported end of the middle ages. Today’s exchange will
    > delve into the history of philology and its basic methodological
    > assumptions, bringing to the fore some of its colonial underpinnings, and
    > asking digital humanists, as part of the conversation, about connections
    > between DH and this core method in humanities research.
    >
    > Event is free and open to the public. Seating is first come, first served
    >
    > More info: http://heymancenter.org/events/on-method-on-philology/ and
    > http://xpmethod.plaintext.in/
    >
    > Part of the series On Method in the Humanities
    >
    > While much time has been spent theorizing the “digital” in Digital
    > Humanities, the On Method in the Humanities series seeks to gain a greater
    > understanding of the heritage and future of humanistic inquiry. In addition
    > to traditional talks and presentations, the aim of the series is to stage
    > productive encounters between theory and method, connecting top theorists
    > and model-makers with makers of things, builders of code, and architects of
    > the pixel.
    >
    > Lectures will examine the range of theoretical and practical methods used
    > by humanities scholars and critics, past and present. Following Thomas
    > Kuhn, how can we outline paradigms of humanistic inquiry? What are the
    > national specificities of these methods? How are the technological
    > challenges and opportunities provided by new research methods
    > (computational, quantitative) and new organizational structures (labs,
    > workshops, co-working) tethered to epistemological shifts as well?
    >

  • Hi All —

    Please see notice of an upcoming event of interest at Columbia below:

    ———- Forwarded message ———-
    From: Grant Wythoff <grant.wythoff@gmail.com>

    Nadia Altschul
    On Philology

    6:15pm, 18 Feb 2015
    Heyman Center for the Humanities
    Second Floor Common Room

    Philology and the reconstruction of texts has been a main humanistic method
    since the purported end of the middle ages. Today’s exchange will delve
    into the history of philology and its basic methodological assumptions,
    bringing to the fore some of its colonial underpinnings, and asking digital
    humanists, as part of the conversation, about connections between DH and
    this core method in humanities research.

    Event is free and open to the public. Seating is first come, first served

    More info: http://heymancenter.org/events/on-method-on-philology/ and

    http://xpmethod.plaintext.in/

    Part of the series On Method in the Humanities

    While much time has been spent theorizing the “digital” in Digital
    Humanities, the On Method in the Humanities series seeks to gain a greater
    understanding of the heritage and future of humanistic inquiry. In addition
    to traditional talks and presentations, the aim of the series is to stage
    productive encounters between theory and method, connecting top theorists
    and model-makers with makers of things, builders of code, and architects of
    the pixel.

    Lectures will examine the range of theoretical and practical methods used
    by humanities scholars and critics, past and present. Following Thomas
    Kuhn, how can we outline paradigms of humanistic inquiry? What are the
    national specificities of these methods? How are the technological
    challenges and opportunities provided by new research methods
    (computational, quantitative) and new organizational structures (labs,
    workshops, co-working) tethered to epistemological shifts as well?

  • Hi All,

    Hoyt Long of the University of Chicago wrote int to ensure that graduate
    students in CUNY were aware of this forthcoming conference on Cultural
    Analytics this May. It looks terrific. Hoyt writes:

    >>
    I’m writing about an opportunity that may be of interest to some of your
    graduate students. We’re hosting a conference on “Cultural Analytics” this
    May, and we’ve received funding to host 4 external students as part of a
    graduate student caucus. We’ve advertised on the various social media
    channels, but I wanted to make sure that students there had seen the
    announcement. For anyone interested in this kind of work, it’ll be a good
    chance for them to get plugged in with some of the leading scholars in the
    field. Information about the conference and application process can be
    found here:

    https://lucian.uchicago.edu/blogs/literarynetworks/2015/01/19/cultural-analytics-conference-graduate-student-caucus-call-for-applicants/

    If you wouldn’t mind passing this along to any students who might be
    interested, I’d really appreciate it. Thanks so much. All the best,
    >>

    I hope that some of you will explore this.

  • ———- Forwarded message ———-
    From: Thomas McGovern <thomas.h.mcgovern@gmail.com>
    Date: Mon, Feb 2, 2015 at 11:16 AM
    Subject: Fwd: FW: Unique graduate course in Environmental Humanities in
    Iceland

    Dear Colleagues

    Apologies for the mass mailing, but we want to let you and your students
    and colleagues know that there are still some places left in the 2015
    Interdisciplinary graduate seminar at Svartarkot in N Iceland this summer.
    The series is a collaboration between NABO (hard science/ social science/
    environmental history spectrum mainly) and NIES (environmental history/
    environmental humanities/ education for sustainability) as part of the
    larger international inter-disciplinary IHOPE Circumpolar Networks
    initiative (http://ihopenet.org/circumpolarnetworks/) *Inscribing
    Environmental Memory in the Icelandic Sagas *project (informally “sagas for
    sustainability”).

    The 2014 seminar was a great success and good fun, and the participants
    had a genuinely unique opportunity to work closely with environmental
    historians, saga scholars, environmental archaeologists, climatologists and
    environmental scientists in the rich and beautiful historical landscape of
    Northern Iceland.

    This year, thanks to NSF support to a North Atlantic Cyberinfrastructure
    project led by Colleen Strawhacker of National Snow and Ice Data Center,
    we are able to combine the Svartarkot seminar with an international
    workshop on using digital tools to build connections across disciplines and
    to create tools for public engagement with issues of sustainability and
    global environmental change. This will be the third North Atlantic
    cyberinfrastructure workshop in a series, and will follow directly upon
    multidisciplinary sessions at U Maryland and U Umea. Experts from US, UK
    and Scandinavia will be interacting with students and Svartarkot staff in
    intensive hands on work aimed at developing products and using the rich
    literary, archaeological, and paleo-environmental record of Iceland as a
    test bed for ambitious efforts to create new integrative approaches towards
    sustainability.

    Students interested in digital humanities approaches, visualization, GIS
    applications in archaeology and environmental history, and building
    genuinely trans-disciplinary collaborations in human ecodynamics and
    sustainability will have a rich and exciting experience.

    Please see the attached for more details, and please feel free to forward
    this message to interested colleagues and students.

    All the best
    Tom McGovern

    ———- Forwarded message ———-
    From: Hartman Steven <steven.hartman@miun.se>
    Date: Sun, Feb 1, 2015 at 7:22 AM
    Subject: FW: Unique graduate course in Environmental Humanities in Iceland
    To: Hartman Steven <steven.hartman@miun.se>

    Dear colleagues,

    Below and attached please find a second call for applications for the
    summer graduate course Understanding the Human Dimensions of Long-term
    Environmental Change: Transformations of Iceland from the Viking Era
    through the late Medieval Period (CE 850-1500), taking place June 5-15
    in Bárðardalur,
    Northern Iceland.

    The first call and application round fell during a period (Dec 15-Jan 15)
    when many people in the academic world may not be monitoring email closely
    due to holiday breaks from regular academic sessions The response to that
    first call was nevertheless strong enough that the organizers are confident
    the course will have the required enrollment to proceed. Nevertheless there
    are still available spots in the course for those who wish to attend, so
    the organizers have elected to open a second round of applications.

    Postdocs and senior scholars are also welcome to apply for the course.

    We hope that you will consider distributing this notice more widely within
    your networks. *The deadline for the second round of applications is March
    15, 2015.*

    If you wish to be removed from the NIES email list please reply with the
    word “Remove” in the subject field.

    Thanks very much! Apologies for any unintended cross-postings.

    Sincerely,

    Steven Hartman
    ________________________________________
    Steven Hartman
    Professor of English
    Coordinator, Mid Sweden University Eco-Humanities Hub (ECOHUM)
    Chair, Nordic Network for Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies (NIES)
    Department of Humanities
    Mid Sweden University
    87170 Sundsvall, Sweden
    Cell/Mobile: +46-(0)703-664 944

    http://miun.academia.edu/StevenHartman

    http://se.linkedin.com/pub/steven-hartman/6/1a0/276/sv

    http://www.miun.se/ecohum

    http://www.miun.se/en/research/major-research-initiatives/research-groups/nies

    From: Viðar Hreinsson <vidar@svartarkot.is>
    Date: fredag 30 januari 2015 13:43
    To: Steven Hartman <steven.hartman@miun.se>, Thomas McGovern <
    thomas.h.mcgovern@gmail.com>
    Subject: Unique graduate course in Environmental Humanities in Iceland

    Dear friends and colleagues

    Please circulate this announcement of an extended deadline for our unique,
    graduate summer course: *Understanding the Human Dimensions of Long-term
    Environmental Change: Transformations of Iceland from the Viking Era
    through the late Medieval Period (CE 850-1500) *in Bárðardalur, Northern
    Iceland, 5-15 June 2015.

    We have decided to open a new application round by popular request, as the
    original application round was missed by many people since it fell during
    the Christmas / New Year holidays. The new deadline is March 15, 2015. Further
    information and a small poster are attached. Please visit our website (
    scn.akademia.is ) for further details. We would be grateful if you could
    circulate to mailing lists and networks far and wide.

    Sincerely

    Viðar Hreinsson


    Viðar Hreinsson
    Bókmenntafræðingur / Literary historian
    Svartárkot, menning / náttúra
    Svartarkot, culture / nature
    ReykjavíkurAkademíunni
    The Reykjavik Academy
    Þórunnartún 2 – 105 Reykjavík – Iceland
    Sími / Phone (+354) 552 3956 (home) / 844 8645 (cell)


    Thomas H McGovern
    Professor
    Director,
    Zooarchaeology Laboratory
    Anthropology Dept.
    Hunter College CUNY
    695 Park Ave NYC 10065
    dept. phone (001) 212 772 5410
    dept. fax (001) 212 772 5423

    Coordinator
    North Atlantic Biocultural Organization (NABO)
    http://www.nabohome.org

    Associate Director
    CUNY Human Ecodynamics Research Center (HERC)

    http://herc.gc.cuny.edu/

  • ———- Forwarded message ———-
    From: Francis Donnelly <Francis.donnelly@baruch.cuny.edu>

    Greetings,

    After a hiatus in the fall, I’m running my GIS Practicum, Introduction to
    GIS Using Open Source Software (using QGIS), again this semester at the
    Baruch College Library. If you have colleagues or students that are
    interested please pass this info along. There are three, day-long sessions
    on Fridays: Feb 27th, Mar 27th, and Apr 24th. Each session is identical.
    Advance registration is required, cost is $30 and includes a tutorial
    manual (newly revised) and light breakfast.

    – Eligible: All graduate students, faculty, and staff who are currently
    affiliated with CUNY

    – Not Eligible: Undergraduates (with the exception of Baruch students),
    Continuing Ed, alumni, and people not affiliated with CUNY

    For more information and to register:

    http://guides.newman.baruch.cuny.edu/gis/gisprac

    I’ve attached a flier that advertises the sessions. Hope your semester is
    off to a good start.

    Best wishes – Frank

    ——————————————————————————–

    *Frank Donnelly* | Geospatial Data Librarian | Baruch College CUNY

    francis.donnelly@baruch.cuny.edu | 646-312-1657

    http://guides.newman.baruch.cuny.edu/gis | http://gothos.info

    ——————————————————————————–

  • Matthew K. Gold commented on the post, Git and GitHub, Part I, on the site Text Transformations 2 weeks, 5 days ago

    This is fantastic, Patrick — thanks so much for contributing it to the class!

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